Refugees have to move in order to save their lives or preserve their freedom. They have no protection from their own state and often it is their own government that is threatening to persecute them. If other countries do not let them in and do not help them once they are in, this may be condemning them to death or to an intolerable life in the shadows, without sustenance and without rights.

Statelessness refers to the condition of someone who is not considered as a national by any country. There are at least 10 million people around the world without a nationality. Statelessness occurs because of discrimination against certain groups, redrawing of borders and gaps in nationality laws. Someone without a nationality cannot live the same life as someone with a nationality. They cannot: get an ID card, open a bank account, own a passport or enrol in university.

The terms asylum-seeker and refugee are often confused. An asylum-seeker is someone who says he or she is a refugee, but whose claim has not yet been definitively evaluated. Those judged through proper procedures not to be refugees, nor to be in need of any other form of international protection, can be sent back to their home countries.
 

Internally displaced persons (IDPs) are among the world’s most vulnerable people. Unlike refugees IPDs have not crossed an international border to find sanctuary but have remained inside their home countries. Like refugees, they were forcibly displaced by conflict, generalised violence and human rights violations. At least 40% of Syria's population, or 7.6 million people, have been displaced - the highest number in the world.


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AS WELL AS CURRENT NEWS


 

The Status:Welcomed team have prayerfully chosen to Tour around New Zealand and Australia to raise awareness about the plight of refugees and gaps in how receiving countries are responding. For those of you that live in New Zealand or Australia, we've compiled helpful links below directing to information on refugees specific to your country.

 

 

 

 

FAQ New Zealand

 


1. How many refugees does New Zealand accept each year?
www.amnesty.org.nz
www.refugeehealth.govt.nz

2. What are the requirements that a refugee must go through in order to get official refugee status?
www.immigration.govt.nz

3. Which are the top countries refugees are fleeing from?
www.unhcr.org/figures at a glance
www.unhcr.org/worldwide displacement

4. What are New Zealand's Human Rights obligations in relation to Asylum Seekers and Refugees?
www.justice.govt.nz

5. Myths about Refugees and Asylum Seekers
www.amnesty.org.nz

6. What are some facts and statistics about Refugees in New Zealand?
www.amnesty.org.nz

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON NEW ZEALAND CLICK ON THE ICONS BELOW


FAQ Australia

 

1. How many Refugees does Australia accept each year?
www.humanrights.gov.au

2. How are asylum seekers' claims decided?
www.humanrights.gov.au

3. Which are the top countries refugees are fleeing from?
www.unhcr.org/figures at a glance
www.unhcr.org/worldwide displacement

4. What happens if a refugee is denied entry?
www.humanrights.gov.au
 


5. What are Australia's Human Rights obligations in relation to asylum seekers and refugees?
www.humanrights.gov.au

6. Myths about refugees & Asylum seekers
www.refugeeconcil.org.au

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON AUSTRALIA CLICK ON THE ICONS BELOW